Bowie’s fragments of reality : The Laughing Gnostic of MIND CONTROL

.

THE ONE THEY ALL IMITATED

.

.

What is art, what is rock music? It’s difficult to describe its codes, its gestures, its aestethics and its perception but for the most part it can be experienced only, and only as an expression of our culture — being in a movement of constant restlessness and mirroring all graspable parts of society. How can the feverish emptiness of endlessly repeated ecstasy be transformed into something that can be sensed, something heard and seen and be paid for? After all, this music is not only qualified through the consciousness of its creator but also through the states of mind created by its perceptors.

.

.

Bowie (born 1947 as David Robert Jones) is seen by some as a sort of ‘Renaissance Man’ whose professed ‘universality’ is an attempt to show the landmarks of evolution by reassembling the fragmentary pieces of our society; and in this, he resembles many occultists.

‘Oh! You Pretty Things’ (1971):

I think about a world to come
Where the books were found by the Golden Ones
Let me make it plain
You gotta make way for the Homo Superior
Look at your children
See their faces in golden rays
Don’t kid yourself they belong to you
They’re the start of a coming race.
Homo Sapiens have outgrown their use
All the strangers came today
And it looks as though they’re here to stay.

.

.

The Cut–Up method: “Inspirations have I none”

.

The cut–up technique was originally devised by the Dadaists and Surrealists who called it automatic writing (écriture automatique) or cadavre exquis, and later reassembled by Brion Gysin and most famously used in literature by William S. Burroughs: you take a text, cut it into pieces, reassemble these pieces haphazardly, and thus create something new.
Burroughs’ approach was an attempt to cut through the apparent manifest content of language (a virus from outer space?) to what he hoped might be some sort of more truthful world. A world of meaning that lay beyond.

It’s probably also worth pointing out that he talks in fractals.

Nico said“I was not jealous of his intelligence — he is entirely superficial, which is why he never knows what to look like. Or what music to make. Or whether to be a boy or a girl.”

.

.

The Laughing Clone

.

Without his all–consuming depressions (“hitting an all time low”) Bowie’s personæ would be a lot harder to understand, and ultimately be of little interest to any researcher, however dedicated. In fact, Bowie is more of a Gnostic than an artist — much, obviously, to his chagrin, as he wants to be known as an artist first and foremost. At the early age of 16, in about 1963 [? some say this song dates from 1971], Bowie penned the lyrics to his song ‘I’m tired of my life’, in which he sketched out his future career: “I’m trying to decide which game is best for me, which can I bear … You don’t perceive so I’m leading you away”. The pattern was the idea of changing identity or thinking up your own identity.

Deciding which game to play is plainly Bowie’s habit of changing personæ, or re–inventing his personality. Thus the idea of ‘finding himself’ showed up in Bowie’s stage ‘fragments’.

.

.

“He is a symbol of a new age / He glides above the realms of you and me”

.

Angie Bowie: “He said that Chime Rimpoche was his guide/teacher. I saw Chime Rimpoche the first time I went down to Beckenham there he was at Victoria station or Charing X and he was there in his saffron robes and I walked up to him and said Hi are you Chime Rimpoche? He said yes. I said I am going to visit David and he said I know. I thought he and David were ‘Light People.'”

.

READ MORE HERE

Such is the stuff from / Where dreams are woven

http://www.parareligion.ch/bowie.htm

.

READ MORE HERE

“Labyrinth” Starring David Bowie: A Blueprint to Mind Control

http://vigilantcitizen.com/moviesandtv/labyrinth-starring-david-bowie-a-blueprint-to-mind-control/#gbgJJLR3mpBWjir4.99

.

READ MORE HERE

David Bowie Outside
Aleister Crowley
And the Holy Grail

http://www.parareligion.ch/2010/bowiegrail.htm

.

.

Advertisements