BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN [ 1935 ] … MOVIE CLIPS

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In the film’s prologue, the camera pans toward a light shining in the window of Lord Byron’s estate on a stormy dark night as thunder crackles. Inside the elegant drawing room of the Villa Diodati on Lake Geneva in Switzerland, in the early 1800s, three characters are lounging and talking together in an historical reconstruction: Lord Byron (Gavin Gordon), poet Percy Shelley (Douglas Walton) and his 19-year-old bride Mary Shelley. The memorable scene recreates a discussion the trio may have had. Before a roaring fire, Mary expresses her unusual fear of thunder and the dark:

Mary Shelley reveals the main characters of her novel survived: Dr. Frankenstein (goaded by an even madder scientist) builds his monster a mate.

The macabre, satirical film is generally considered one of the greatest horror films of all time – a spectacular, bizarre, high-camp, excessive, humorous, farcical and surrealistic film. Both Frankenstein films were produced by Carl Laemmle, Jr. (the head of Universal) and directed by horror master James Whale, at a time when monster films were diminishing. The film reunited Colin Clive (as Dr. Frankenstein) with Boris Karloff as the Monster, but brought two new characters to the forefront: Ernest Thesiger as a necromancer who has miniaturized and imprisoned various human beings in glass jars, and Elsa Lanchester as the Monster’s Bride.

Whale anticipated all current and future horror parodies with his effective, insurmountable, over-the-top swan song to the genre. The next two films in the series were Universal’s second sequel to the original 1931 film – director Rowland V. Lee’sSon of Frankenstein (1939), featuring Karloff’s third and final appearance as The Monster in a feature film. This was followed by the all-star The House of Frankenstein (1944), with Boris Karloff in the role of the evil scientist Dr. Niemann

With cinematographer John Mescall, Whale expertly created a haunting mood in the film, bringing the influence of German Expressionism into its stylistic imagery and sets and into the performance of the Monster’s Bride (Elsa Lanchester) with her jerky robotic movements. He also humanized the Monster by educating and civilizing him, extending his range of expressions and speaking of words, and making him more self-aware. The impressive musical score was composed by Franz Waxman. As in the original film, the screenplay (by John L. Balderston and William Hurlbut) was adapted from Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s 1816 novel.

In the opening (and closing) credits, ‘The Monster’s Mate’ is identified with only a question mark, although Elsa Lanchester is credited for playing Mary Shelley in the film’s prologue. [Her dual role as the creator/author of the tale and as the created creature, the Monster Bride, is symbolic of how evil, monstrous forces lie within all of us.] The Monster himself, the biggest star of Universal Studios in the mid-30s, is billed above the film’s title with his surname only in bold letters: KARLOFF. This was Karloff’s second performance as the creature.

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INFORMATION :

WIKIPEDIA

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